RAIL TRANSIT IN SUBURBAN DETROIT

WOODWARD CORRIDOR

(DUR Pontiac Division/Flint Division)

FLINT
Additional local history included on this page.

1895 - Pontiac and Sylvan Lake Railway introduces streetcar service in Pontiac, and west to Sylvan Lake.

1895 - Oakland Railway incorporated to construct interurban line north of Detroit to Pontiac.

1896 - interurban line completed north to Birmingham.

1897 - Oakland Railway sold to Detroit and Pontiac Railway Co. Interurban line completed to Pontiac, using streetcar trackage of Pontiac and Sylvan Lake Railway within Pontiac.

1899 - Pontiac and Sylvan Lake Railway sold to Detroit and Northwestern Railway.

1899 - Detroit and Lake Orion Railway incorporated, opens line from Royal Oak to Romeo, with Detroit and Pontiac Railway Co. trackage used south of Royal Oak.

1900 - Detroit and Lake Orion Railway opens line from Rochester to Oxford.

1901 - line completed from Oxford to Flint, by Detroit and Lake Orion Railway subsidiary Detroit Lake Orion and Flint Railway.

1901 - Detroit United Railway acquires all street railways in Detroit, along with most area interurban railways. Woodward corridor becomes the Pontiac Division, and former Detroit and Lake Orion Railway becomes Flint Division.

1914 - line completed from Romeo to Almont.

1915 - line completed from Almont to Imlay City.

1916 - Detroit United Railway forms subsidiary Highland Park and Royal Oak Railroad, to construct a bypass interurban route along Oakland Ave. Route would relieve congestion on Woodward, which had become a problem after opening of Ford auto plant in Highland Park. Construction would be delayed due to World War I.

1919 - Highland Park and Royal Oak Railroad line completed. Line was known as the Stephenson Line, after land developer B. F. Stephenson.

1927 - interurban railway service discontinued from Romeo to Imlay City, replaced with bus service from Detroit operated by Detroit United Railway subsidiary White Star Motorbus Co.

1931 - interurban railway service discontinued from Detroit to Pontiac and Flint. Trackage north of Detroit city limits acquired by city Royal Oak, enabling preservation of streetcar service between Detroit and Royal Oak, operated by Detroit Department of Street Railways.

1934 - interurban railway service discontinued on Highland Park and Royal Oak Railroad line. Eastern Michigan Railways had been required to continue service to retain the right of way property, which explains this being the final interurban line to be abandoned in eastern Michigan.

Local service subsequently evolved to SMART bus route 450.


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